Auctions are once again dominating the Auckland market

by Alistair Helm in ,


Earlier this year there were signs that auctions had lost their lustre, but examining the past 7 days of new listings coming onto the market in Auckland shows that close to half of all new listings are being marketed as auctions!

Here are the facts - between September 22nd and today (the 29th), 808 properties have been listed across the Auckland region from data on Realestate.co.nz. Of this total 400 are being marketed as an Auction. Over the month of September a total 1,113 properties on the market today are marketed as auctions which represents 43% of the total of properties listed in the month. Of course properties listed in the first week of September with a 3 week campaign will now most likely be sold, thereby explaining the difference between the c. 50% in the past 7 days and 43% for the past month.

Clearly auctions are the hot topics and the most favoured method of sale.

But as ever the question should be asked as to the success of auctions. However when it comes to the success of auctions, this is where interpretation of figures becomes something of an art form!

Last week there were a couple of media articles which showcased auction performance.

The NZ Herald on Saturday examined the Barfoot & Thompson auction in the city office and stated that they sat through 27 auctions of which 11 sold under the hammer with 10 passing in below reserve and 6 with no bids - a 41% success rate. The article went on to quote Peter Thompson reporting a 55% success rate - this number being the total of 11 sales plus a further 9 properties which had sold prior to auction. Now you can see why reporting on auction success is an art form!

The article quoted Harcourts saying that at a Christchurch auction in the week there were 23 sold from 25 presented at the Harcourts Grenadier offices in the city. Across the city another Harcourts office (Gold) reported selling 10 from 15 under the hammer.

Now none of these figures will surprise as circumstances at every auction event will be very different and so will be the outcome. However in my mind the key matter in reporting auction success is simply this. Success is defined as how many properties of those offered at ann auction event are sold under the hammer or at least within the next working day as is now the defined period under the Fair Trading Act. It is not relevant or appropriate to add to this list properties sold before the event (even if they were sold at an auction) nor properties that sold outside of this defined new time period.

I applaud Barfoot & Thompson who have embraced this new law change in their publicity of auction performance as they now simply detail (i) sold under the hammer (ii) sold prior (iii) sold by 5pm next working day to arrive at total auctions. However they have ceased to detail total passed in as they used to do.

I have been keeping a record of these monthly reports from Barfoot & Thompson for the past 18 months and as you can see they provide a vital snapshot of the Auckland market (accepting for some months of no data).

t the peak of the property cycle back in first half of 2013 Barfoot &Thompson were reporting property sold under the hammer (plus on the day) consistently exceeded 40% of all monthly sales. Through the first half of 2014 this had fallen to less than a third in March and May, although April was incredibly active and successful. The last two months though have seen a fall off. It will be interesting to see the September results.

Looking outside of Barfoot & Thompson and the Auckland market the REINZ data of auction sales is the most reliable. I would have to qualify that statement though by saying that the data of auction sale has no clear definition. I would hesitate to guess that it simply relates to the sale of properties which were listed as being an auction irrespective of how the sale  was concluded. 

The data for the past 3 full years shows this interesting trend based on the first 8 months in total for each of the past 3 years.

 

Auckland auctions rose significantly between 2012 and 2013 (27% to 37%) before easing off this year, however the focus of auctions has certainly spread outside of Auckland where now the proportion of sales represented by properties marketed as auctions has risen consistently to now represent 8.5% of the total sales outside of Auckland (equivalent to 1 in 12) in the first 8 months of this year.

It certainly appears that auctions are once again the most preferred method of sale for Auckland agents and a growing number outside of Auckland.